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Decoding a Hydraulic Hose Layline

Have you noticed all the writing on your hydraulic hoses? To most people it looks like a bunch of words, and to others it is an indispensable source of information about hose identification. The layline runs the length of the hose with information to assist in the

re-ordering of an existing hose.

The table below breaks down the hydraulic hose layline to help you understand each section and its significance. Layline Sample

Sometimes you may see "No-Skive" printed on some of your hoses. No-Skive Hose refers to removing (or shaving) part of the hose cover and/or inner tube prior to attaching hose ends. No-Skive means the hose and fittings are designed to work without this step. Therefore, a No-Skive hose speeds up the time of a hose assembly and there is no additional equipment or clean up needed.

You also may see a tag on the hose, which is also used for identification purposes. For instance, you may see a hose with Parker Tracking System (PTS). This innovative system provides fast and accurate product information, speeding up replacement regardless of where or when the original component was created.

The layline can also be used as a visual index when routing and tightening the assembly to ensure the hose is not twisted or kinked. And as we mentioned, the information can be used when re-ordering a hose and when using the STAMP method, which is included in Parker’s HoseFinder app.


Knowing what you are looking for will save you time and money while having confidence that you are installing the right hose for your application.

Watch the video below to learn more about decoding hydraulic hose laylines.

Colliflower makes hose assemblies - FAST! To order a new Parker hydraulic hose so you can get back to work, contact us or visit any of our 32 locations today!


We look forward to serving you!

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